All information on this page has been excerpted from Diana Nyad's blog , the Edith Lake website and the KickStarter Campaign for PACKED IN A TRUNK- A Documentary for a Lost Artist

 
b2ap3_thumbnail_edith_bw_vignette_small.jpg

In 1925 Artist Edith Lake Wilkinson was committed to an asylum. Her art was packed away and she was never heard from again...until now.

PACKED IN A TRUNK is a documentary film celebrating the long-buried talent of the painter Edith Lake Wilkinson who was part of the Provincetown art scene in the early 20th century and produced an astounding body of work.

 

The backstory 

An integral part of this film will be the musical score composed by the incredibly gifted singer-songwriter Danielle Anderson who goes by the stage name “Danielle Ate The Sandwich." It’s Danielle’s song that you hear at the end of our trailer (as well as several small musical cues throughout) and she will help give Edith a voice through the music that will accompany the story. To learn more about Danielle Ate The Sandwich you can visit her website: http://danielleatethesandwich.com/

 

 
Jane Anderson is one of the most talented writers of our time. From "Normal" with Jessica Lange to "Mad Men" to perhaps the most perfectly crafted story ever written for television, "If These Walls Could Talk 2", Jane uses words to speak to the heart of the human condition. Photo by Barbara Green

Jane Anderson is one of the most talented writers of our time. From "Normal" with Jessica Lange to "Mad Men" to perhaps the most perfectly crafted story ever written for television, "If These Walls Could Talk 2", Jane uses words to speak to the heart of the human condition.

Photo by Barbara Green

 
 

Jane Anderson tells the story of injustice....the story of her great aunt 

"You will be spellbound....by Jane's mastery in telling the story, by the shocking events that befell Edith, and by the extraordinary expression that emanates from her paintings."


"No one in the family ever talked about poor Aunt Edith. She had been shut away in a mental institution for years and back in those days, that was just something that nice families didn’t talk about. But when my mother opened the trunks, she found dozens of Edith's light-drenched canvasses tucked in with her moldering clothes. This wasn’t the work of an amateur painter or a mentally unstable naïf.   These were sophisticated pieces done by a gifted artist, who was clearly trained and influenced by the art movements of her day."

 

 
 
Do you think that the fact that your great-aunt Edith had a female "companion" had anything to do with her commitment?

"Of course, that's the first thing that I went to, when I found out that Edith was sharing her life with Fannie."

  

 
 

"The fellow who checked her in was a lawyer who was in charge of her inheritance. Once Edith was put away, he started using her funds for his own enjoyment. Fannie passed away. The money in Edith's estate disappeared and she was moved into a state institution in West Virginia where she spent the last twenty-four years of her life locked up in a ward for incurables."

 

 
 

Why have you decided to make a documentary about Edith?
A lot of people have said to me, you're a screenwriter, why don't you make a film about Edith? That seems all wrong. I want the focus to be on Edith's art, not mine. And there're still so many unanswered questions about her life. You make a documentary to uncover a mystery. I've partnered with two wonderful documentary filmmakers, Barbara Green and Michelle Boyaner who have the skill and the artistry and the heart to do justice to Edith's story.

 

 
 

There are no items to display from the selected collection.